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*French Language and Culture

Lyon, France ; Paris, France

IntroductionAcademicsLocation Faculty Program Director CostsDatesApplication

Introduction

The MU International Center sponsors this summer, faculty-led study abroad program in collaboration with the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures. Carol Lazzaro-Weis, professor of French and Italian at MU, will lead this six-credit program in Lyon, France, in conjunction with Sciences-U Lyon.

During the program, students will live and study French and French culture in Lyon and attend tours of restaurants, local food producers, museums, Roman ruins and churches in and around the city. Professor Lazzaro-Weis will teach Consuming Culture, which will serve as an introduction to French culture and identity as understood, practiced and imagined through gastronomy.

Surrounded by verdant hills at the confluence of the Rhône and Saone rivers, Lyon has long been the gastronomic capital of France. For centuries the farms, vineyards and pastures that dot the countryside have provided a seemingly infinite source of sustenance and variety to this thriving commercial and trade center. The program will offer students a venue in which to improve their mastery of the French language through course work and immersion homestays while they sample some of Lyon's gastronomic delights.

Academics

Courses

Students will enroll in one of the following tracks depending upon their level of ability for a total of six credit hours. Some course will be taught by Sciences-U faculty members. The capstone course will be taught by Professor Lazzaro-Weis.

Track one (equivalent to second year French)
  • French 2100: Elementary French 3 (3) is a multiskill course following French 1200, centering on cultural or literary reading and including a grammar review, practice in the spoken language, as well as some practice in written expression. Prerequisite: French 1200 or equivalent.
  • French 2160: Intermediate French Composition and Conversation (3) is a course taught by Sciences-U staff and designed to help students develop the ability to speak, read and write in French via the reading of French short stories and/or a short novel. The course will include a grammar review. Prerequisite: French 1200 or equivalent.
Track two (equivalent to third year French)
  • French 3160: Advanced French Composition and Conversation I (3) is a course taught by Sciences-U staff and designed to help students develop more sophisticated skills of written and oral expression. Taught by Sciences-U staff. Prerequisite: French 2160 or equivalent.
  • French 3180: Foundations de la civilization française (3) is an overview of French civilization form its origins to the French Revolution. Students will examine key cultural objects from art, literature and popular culture, as well as selected political and historical movements that have shaped the development of French civilization. This course is ideal for students interested in engaging with issues, debates and problems that helped to define the nascent French state. One of its goals is to help students understand and analyze the complex interplay that exists between art and culture on one hand and society and politics on the other. Taught by Sciences-U staff. Prerequisite: French 2160 or equivalent.
Track three (equivalent to third year French)
  • French 3160: Advanced French Composition and Conversation I (3) is a course taught by Sciences-U staff and designed to help students develop more sophisticated skills of written and oral expression. Taught by Sciences-U staff. Prerequisite: French 2160 or equivalent.
  • French 4993/4993H: CAPSTONE: Special Themes in French — Food, Culture and French Identity (3), taught by Professor Lazzaro-Weis, will have students analyze the complex and ever-evolving relationship that the French have with their food. Students will consider how the practices of "eating well" (or not so well) can be useful in understanding the cultural politics at play in the development and propagation of French national identity. Students will examine literary and historical texts, as well as visual media, related to food culture. In addition, students will make several pedagogic visits to learn more about the cultural practices of food in and around Lyon. Possible visits include: a culinary institute for a lecture and culinary demonstration, a regional cheese producer, a local farmer's market, vineyards and museums. Prerequisite: French 2160 or equivalent.
Track four (equivalent to fourth year French)
  • French 3180: Foundations de la civilization française (3) is an overview of French civilization form its origins to the French Revolution. Taught by Sciences-U staff, students will examine key cultural objects from art, literature and popular culture, as well as selected political and historical movements that have shaped the development of French civilization. This course is ideal for students interested in engaging with issues, debates and problems that helped to define the nascent French state. One of its goals is to help students understand and analyze the complex interplay that exists between art and culture on one hand and society and politics on the other. Taught by Sciences-U staff. Prerequisite: French 2160 or equivalent.
  • French 4993/4993H: CAPSTONE: Special Themes in French — Food, Culture and French Identity (3), taught by Professor Lazzaro-Weis, will have students analyze the complex and ever-evolving relationship that the French have with their food. Students will consider how the practices of "eating well" (or not so well) can be useful in understanding the cultural politics at play in the development and propagation of French national identity. Students will examine literary and historical texts, as well as visual media, related to food culture. In addition, students will make several pedagogic visits to learn more about the cultural practices of food in and around Lyon. Possible visits include: a culinary institute for a lecture and culinary demonstration, a regional cheese producer, a local farmer's market, vineyards and museums. Prerequisite: French 2160 or equivalent.

Academic credit

All students will be enrolled in actual MU courses. All students are guaranteed to receive MU credit for successfully completed courses; however, students must work with their academic adviser(s) to obtain pre-approval as to how courses might fulfill degree requirements.

MU students: Grades will calculate into students' MU GPAs and appear on students' MU transcripts when grades are recorded by the faculty program director. Students must work with their academic adviser(s) to obtain pre-approval as to how the courses might fulfill degree requirements.

Non-MU/visiting students: Transcripts will be issued from MU and can be mailed to students' home universities. Students must work with their home universities to determine how credit from the program will transfer. The MU International Center will issue one transcript per student to one domestic address, as indicated on the student's Non-MU Student Application for Study Abroad. Additional MU transcripts for study abroad must be requested and purchased from the MU Registrar.

Location

Host program

Sciences-U Lyon is a nationally recognized private educational organization that offers courses in a variety of subjects from the French language to computing. Located in Lyon's city center, the school is easily accessible and near many of the city's main attractions. Science-U's newly constructed building provides students with many amenities including internet access at the computer lab.

Accommodations and meals

Students will be provided with homestays in Lyon. Homestays will provide breakfast and dinner seven days a week and laundry service once a week. Each homestay has been carefully selected in order to accommodate students' specific needs and to ensure a comfortable living situation.

Host city and surrounding areas

Lyon is a busy metropolitan city, rich in culture and history dating back to Roman times. Lyon was once the capital of the Gallo-Roman Empire, and as the current capital of the Rhône-Alpes region, Lyon is the second largest metropolitan area in France, after Paris. The perfect blend of city and countryside, Lyon provides visitors with a balanced view of contemporary life in France.

Lyon's extensive forms of art and architecture also preserve its history and influence its future. Visitors can attribute the numerous art galleries and fashion houses found in Lyon today to its past as a center for trade and artistic development. The city is known for its Roman ruins and extensive network of covered walkways (traboules) that were created during the Renaissance. During this time Lyon was not only the origin of the early printing press and frescos in France, but was also a hub of the silk industry that continues to flourish today. The picturesque streets and well-preserved architecture of the Old Renaissance quarter of the old city (Vieux-Lyon) remain an active part of the city and the quarter is considered to be an UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The city is also known as the Gastronomic Capital of France. Of particular note are the bouchons Lyonnais, which are informal restaurants that provide delicious and traditional regional dishes at a great value. The region is also famous for its Beaujolais wine and delicious chocolates from Berachon and Voisin confiseurs.

Built on the banks of the two rivers Le Rhône and La Saône, Lyon is surrounded by hills that offer beautiful views of the city. Two of the most well known are Fourvière with its basilica, called "the praying hill," and La Croix Rousse, called "the working hill," with its silk factories. Lyon has many scenic paths available to visitors through parks, riverbanks or Roman ruins, as well as a modern tram, bus and metro system that provides an inexpensive way to navigate the city quickly.

Lyon is a vibrant city, where welcoming people help balance out its large size. The city provides an ideal location for students to improve their use of the French language and knowledge of French culture while experiencing some of the best food, art and architecture in France.

Excursions

Students will travel with the group but they will have opportunities to explore some sites independently during their time abroad. Travel might include:

  • One week in Paris to start the program
  • Themed excursions in and around Lyon to explore food culture and local tradition
  • Visits to historical sites and attractions
  • Weekend excursion to areas such as Provence, the French Alps or Beaujolais

Tentative itinerary

  • May 30: Arrive in Paris
  • June 5: Travel to Lyon
  • June 6-July 11: Class in Lyon
  • July 15: End of program

Faculty program director

University of Missouri faculty member Carol Lazzaro-Weis, MU Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, will accompany the students to Lyon as the faculty program director.

Faculty-led programs enrich the study abroad experience as well as the MU campus by providing students opportunities to study other cultures and disciplines in depth while gaining new perspectives on our own society. Faculty leaders serve as mentors, role-models and resources as students explore their host institution and country.

Carol Lazzaro-Weis

Carol Lazzaro-Weis

Carol Lazzaro-Weis joined the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures as chair and professor of French and Italian in January 2003. Her teaching and research interests include the 17th- and 18th-century French novel, French women writers of the 17th and 18th centuries, race and the Enlightenment, 19- and 20th-century Italian literature, Francophone literature of North America, contemporary Italian women writers, genre and feminist theory. More information on her research can be found on the Romance Languages and Literatures website.

Dr. Lazzaro-Weis has previously led study abroad programs in Paris (summers 2004 and 2005) and Lyon (summers 2011 and 2013).

Costs

Program Budget

Additional Expenses

In addition to the program costs paid to MU, you will have expenses associated with international travel and living abroad. The amounts listed are estimated costs based on current exchange rates and on the information provided to us by your host institution and past participants. Depending on your personal spending habits, you may spend more or less than the figures provided.

Please note that these expenses do not include vacation travel or sightseeing.

Financial Aid Information

If you are awarded financial aid for study abroad, it will be applied to your MU account according to the regular financial aid disbursement schedule. Reminder: You must be enrolled in study abroad and have completed the required financial aid forms for study abroad in order to be considered for aid.

Because non-resident tuition charges apply, MU students should be eligible to use non-resident scholarship towards the program costs.

Dates and Deadlines

Term Application Deadline Program Start Program End
Summer 2015 02/17/2015 05/30/2015 07/15/2015

Early acceptance date for summer 2015 programs: December 19, 2014

Summer faculty-led programs fill up quickly! Submit your application by the early acceptance date to ensure preferred consideration for admission and to be eligible for International Center scholarship funds reserved for early acceptance applicants. Applications are still welcome after the early acceptance date, but must be received by the final application deadline for consideration.

Application

We are delighted that you are applying to study abroad. This is the first step of your journey, and while there is a lot to do, it should not be overwhelming. Once you apply for the program, you will have an electronic checklist to help you through the process. In addition, our study abroad staff are available to answer your questions.

  1. Meet with the MU International Center study abroad adviser for your program or country of interest.
  2. If you are an MU Student, start an application in using the button below. Non-MU students should visit our page for Non-MU participants for more information about the application process. Please note:
    • Once you have started an application, you can login again using the myStudyAbroad button above.
    • By starting an application you will incur a $50 application fee, even if you do not complete your application.
  3. Complete your application. There will be several documents that need to be completed for the application. While specific requirements vary by program, a typical application consists of the following:
    • Material submissions - Printable forms which require the physical submission of materials.
    • Signature Documents - Items you may digitally sign (if you are over 18 years of age) to indicate your agreement and understanding.
      • Program confirmation and conditions of participation
      • Financial Planning Worksheet
    • Recommendation Forms - Recommendations may be submitted electronically by MU faculty and staff.
    • Application Questionnaires - Items that you complete and submit electronically.
      • Application Certification
      • Essay
      • International Center scholarship application

This program is not currently accepting applications.

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